Category Archives: Children

When can I leave my child alone?

This is a question that all parents ask themselves and there doesn’t seem to be a definitive answer, hence the stories in the paper about 8-year-olds being returned by the police when catching the bus by themselves. Personally I remember catching 2 buses to primary school, so times they are a-changing, indeed!

I am currently studying to become a NSW Primary School Teacher, and as such become a mandatory reporter in issues of children at risk of harm. The following comes from the Mandatory Reporter Guide which can be found online at  the NSW Community Services Website and could help clarify the matter.

 

Child/young person MAY be considered in danger if left alone longer than indicated in the following table. These times are a guide only. Times would be dependent on the environmental context and the individual characteristics of the child/young person. For example, a toddler who is unable to swim should not be unattended near water for any amount of time. The greater the environmental risk, the shorter the time a child/young person should be unattended. The circumstances listed provide examples of conditions that, if present, may mitigate risk.

 

Age / Developmental Age of
Oldest Child / Young Person
Time Alone Circumstances
Infant/Toddler May be briefly unattended with parent/carer in another room. • Another responsible adult is present.
• Child is asleep or in safe setting (e.g., play pen, child seat,protected area) while parent/carer sleeps or attends to other responsibilities, including self-care.
Preschool 5–15 minutes, parent/carer within hearing of child Child is asleep, quietly playing, or in safe circumstances and has been given instructions child is capable of following for remaining where he/she is.
Ages 5–7 15–60 minutes, parent/carer within hearing of child Child is asleep, quietly playing, or in safe circumstances and has been given instructions child is capable of following for remaining where he/she is.
Ages 8–9 2 hours Child is in safe circumstances and has been given instructions child is capable of following for remaining where he/she is.
Ages 10–13 12 hours, and not alone between 10:00p.m and 6:00a.m. • There is a backup adult available to child who is accessible, on call and able to give assistance.
• Not responsible for supervision of more than two other children.
Ages 14–15 24 hours • There is a backup adult available to child.
• Child has demonstrated ability to self-supervise.
• Not responsible for supervision of more than two other children.
Ages 16–17 More than 24 hours Assess safety based on young person’s capacity to live independently. Refer to ‘Lack of Shelter’ decision tree if needed.

Breast Milk: How Much to Express?

One question that breastfeeding mothers always ask at some point is…

How much breast milk do I need to express for my baby?

The answer is: It depends

Accurate, but not very helpful. However there are a couple of different guidelines that I found useful while breastfeeding:

Method 1: Average Intake

Age Per Feeding Total Daily Average
0-2 Months 2-5oz (60-150ml) 26oz (801ml)
2-4 Months 4-6oz (115-180ml) 30oz (887ml)
4-6 Months 5-7oz (150-210ml) 31oz (915ml)

 

Baby Weight Amount in 24 hours
8 lbs (3.6 kg) 21.3oz (639ml)
9 lbs (4 kg) 24oz (720ml)
10 lbs (4.5 kg) 26.7oz (801ml)
11 lbs (4.9 kg) 29.3oz (879ml)
12 lbs (5.4 kg) 32oz (960ml)
14 lbs (6.4 kg) 37.3oz (1,119ml)
16 lbs (7.3 kg) 42.7oz (1,280ml)

 

Method 2: Calculate

Approximate Conversions:

1oz = 30ml    2.2lb = 1kg

Take your baby’s weight in pounds and multiply it by two and a half or three times. Then, divide this number by the total number of  feedings a day to arrive at the approximate feeding amount, in ounces, for each feed.

 Formula in pounds and ounces:

Baby Weight x 2.5 = Daily Min                Baby Weight x 3 = Daily Max

Daily Min / Feeds per day = Min Feed

Daily Max / Feeds per day = Max Feed

Approximate amount per feed = Between Min Feed and Max Feed

Example: For a 10lb baby who feeds 8 times a day (includes night feeds)

10 x 2.5 = 25    10 x 3 = 30

So the baby will probably be drinking between 25oz and 30oz per day (in a 24 hour period).

25 / 8 = 3.125      30 / 8 = 3.75

So the baby will probably be drinking between 3oz and 4oz at each feed.

——————

Formula in kilograms and ml:

Baby Weight x 2.2 x 2.5 x 30 = Daily Min    Baby Weight x 2.2 x 3 x 30 = Daily Max

Daily Min / Feeds per day = Min Feed

Daily Max / Feeds per day = Max Feed

Example: 4.5kg baby who feeds 8 times a day (includes night feeds)

4.5 x 2.2 x 2.5 x 30 = 742.5       4.5 x 2.2 x 3 x 30 = 891

So the baby will probably be drinking between 742.5ml and 891ml per day (in a 24 hour period)

742.5 / 8 = 92.8125     891 / 8 = 111.375

So the baby will probably be drinking between 90ml and 120ml at each feed.

———————

Of course every baby is different, but this gives you somewhere to start. Try the approximate amounts and if the baby is still hungry try increasing it by 1oz or 30mls at a time.

TIP: Use an electric pump as they are easier to use and you can get more milk in each session. The ABA (Australian Breastfeeding Association) has some pumps that they recommend, check out their website.

Also many chemists will hire out pumps, definitely try before you buy so you get one that works for you.

Toilet Roll Telecopes

Little Bug (3-yrs-old) found some empty toilet rolls, and has been running around playing telescopes with them. He hands them out to Mummy and Daddy to join in the game as well.

We can use them to look around the house and name everything we see. We can pretend to be pirates looking for treasure, or spotting other ships. Hours of free amusement and we didn’t even need to paint them 🙂

I like to keep little things that we can repurpose for other uses, and the cardboard tube that the toilet paper comes on is very useful. The rolls from the glad wrap (cling film) and foil, or paper towels are the same but a little longer.

Some other things you can make from toilet rolls are:

  • Dolls/puppets – just add head made from scrunched up newspaper, then paint or dress as you like
  • Construction – they make great legs for anything paper mache
  • Shakers – put cling film or foil or masking tape over the ends and some rice or beans inside and there you have musical instruments.
  • Angel for the christmas tree – as for the dolls above, but add wings, etc and you can stick it on top of the tree.

Movie Review: Hoodwinked Too

 

We went to see Hoodwinked Too at the movies and throughly enjoyed it. My three-year old sat through the entire thing without running up and down the aisles so it must have been good. 🙂

Carrying on the tradition of fractured fairy tales like the first Hoodwinked, Red and the Big Bad Wolf must work together to save Granny.

I would recommend this as a good family movie for all ages. The grown ups will have fun spotting all the fairy tales references, and the kids will just have fun. A little bit scary, but predictable enough to stop the kids from crying.

I will consider adding it to my collection when it comes out on DVD.

April 2011 Planting

On April 30 LittleBug and I planted out the following in the freshly manured garden bed, which by then had been rained on for a couple of days.

Climbing Peas – Greenfeast (2 squares, 8 seeds)

Silverbeet – Five Colour Mix (1 square, 5 seeds)

Tomato – Gardeners Delight (4 squares, 8 seeds)

Onion – Hunter River Browns (2 squares, 6 rows)

Broccoli – Waltham (4 squares, 8 seeds)

Beetroot – Heirloom Mix (4 squares, 12 rows)

Empty squares left: 15

Lets see how they grow, I’ll be keeping an eye out for shoots.